Collection: Koi Pond Medication

There is a lot of debate about the best koi medication to employ for different purposes, and the topic is complicated and perplexing overall. This is true whether you're treating the water in the pond or the koi themselves. To the best of our abilities, we will attempt to provide guidance in this part.

Β 

Adding chemicals to a pond with the intention of curing illness is ironic because chemicals raise stress levels in fish, which is already invasive. The majority of pond treatments have the effect of decreasing the amount of oxygen in the water. Fish can have their protective mucous coating drastically reduced by certain substances. Chemical die back can worsen changes in pH levels and other parameters. When Koi experience changes in water quality that stress them out, it might lead to an increase in their ammonia output. The good microorganisms that the pond and filter need are killed off by all chemicals.

Β 

It is difficult to properly estimate the amount of harm done to the confined ecosystem by any one chemical. Just as an example, anti-bacterial medicines reduce bacterial numbers without distinction, meaning that all bacteria, good and bad, would be affected. Water quality must be restored after the addition of any chemical to the pond in order to prevent a rise in pollution levels, which is a common occurrence.

Β 

It is recommended to begin water quality monitoring after any pond-wide remediation plans. Adding nitrifying bacteria to the filter and pond again is a great idea. In order to alleviate some of the strain on the "strained" filter system, it is recommended to refrain from feeding while applying medication. Return to regular feeding levels according to the findings of your water tests.

Β 

Knowing the volume of the pond you want to treat is essential before administering medicine. It's important to know the correct amount of chemical to add; adding too much can be deadly, while adding too little will have no impact. It is equally crucial to accurately measure dose rates.

Β 

To avoid stressing out the fish too much with a single dose, always pre-mix the measured quantity into a large bucket of pond water. Add a quarter of the mix to the pond initially, and then add more after 15 or 20 minutes. This way, the fish can become used to the medication gradually. Add chemicals to your pond at your own risk; doing so can drastically lower the oxygen levels. Another thing to keep in mind is that, unless absolutely necessary, you shouldn't add chemicals in the evening, when the oxygen levels are already low.

Β 

The most challenging aspect of pond treatment is likely to be selecting the appropriate chemical. Consequently, if you happen to spot a few fish "flicking" or "flashing" in the wee hours of the morning or late at night, it's probably just due to the reduced oxygen levels in the water.

Β 

Finally, before you add any chemicals to your water, make sure it's tested. If you think you have parasites, you'll need a high-quality microscope to identify them. If you don't already have one, you should definitely prioritise purchasing one.

Β